By Kenneth James Moore

PIECES OF WOOD

An international crime thriller based on actual events

Inspired by a startling new discovery, the novel Pieces of Wood is an international crime story evidencing Imperial Japan’s fourteen year-long brutalization of women at the outset of the Twentieth Century.

As two sons of “The Rising Sun” bring their fathers’ vile disregard for human life to 1978 Chicago, there the first side arm-bearing female FBI agent in fifty years must put a stop to both antagonists as Illinois’, nuclear power plant is just days away from coming on-line.

In its opening chapters, Pieces of Wood describes the real-life destruction of 5,000 women burned alive by the Imperial Japanese military in expressly built, refractory ovens on the island of Saipan, in 1944.

As told through the mind’s eye of the first of Pieces of Wood’s main characters, the story continues as this former, World War Two, Marine combat veteran turned Chicago industrialist recounts how he witnessed Japan’s military under orders, attempt to brutally obliterate the female population of their nation’s enemies as they swept across half the globe. War ended before reaching the United States but not so the motivation behind it.

Fires are lit as the clock ticks in the explosive opening chapter of this historically-based, action-packed crime novel by first-time author Kenneth James Moore.

Author’s note: I wrote a speech entitled The Hunt For The Life of Riley to be given at the NYC reunion of the 20th Air Force Bomber Command, the group with whom my uncle flew during WWII. I became ill and unable to attend. In my absence, the speech was given by Bob Cassaday, a friend from Richland, Washington. These were some of the reactions from that speech:

 

    • From world-renowned marksman Bob “Shooter” Allen, a former B-29 bomber group commander: “The high point of our reunion was the presentation of your story The Hunt For The Life of Riley and accompanying slides. What an exciting adventure it must have been! It really got the attention of the hundreds of people in the room. I remember Colonel Riley very well. He’d be honored.”

 

    • From Rear Tail gunner Bob Cassaday: “The speech, The Hunt For The Life of Riley was given Sunday morning October 7th, 2000, after breakfast to more than several hundred of us. Many came up to me afterwards. All they could say was Wow! But what really threw me for a loop is when I got home. People were calling me from a far away as Maine and Florida, knowing Ken is a friend of mine, wanting him and his group, Moore’s Marauders, to help them find information about their (MIA) relatives.”

 

    • From audience member Fiske Hanley, of Ft. Worth, Texas, published author and B-29 flight engineer who flew The Life of Riley the day before it “vanished without a trace:” “Your writing was well done and mighty interesting. If I ever get lost, I hope you come looking for me. I can’t wait to read your upcoming book.”

By Kenneth James Moore

PIECES OF WOOD

A true history

Inspired by a startling new discovery, the novel Pieces of Wood is an international crime story evidencing Imperial Japan’s fourteen year-long brutalization of women at the outset of the Twentieth Century.

As two sons of “The Rising Sun” bring their fathers’ vile disregard for human life to 1978 Chicago, there the first side arm-bearing female FBI agent in fifty years must put a stop to both antagonists as Illinois’, nuclear power plant is just days away from coming on-line.

In its opening chapters, Pieces of Wood describes the real-life destruction of 5,000 Korean women burned alive by the Imperial Japanese military in expressly built, refractory ovens on the island of Saipan, in 1944.

As told through the mind’s eye of the first of Pieces of Wood’s main characters, the story continues as this former, World War Two, Marine combat veteran turned Chicago industrialist recounts how he witnessed Japan’s military under orders, attempt to brutally obliterate the female population of their nation’s enemies as they swept across half the globe. War ended before reaching the United States but not so the motivation behind it.
​Fires are lit as the clock ticks in the explosive opening chapter of this historically-based, action-packed crime novel by first-time author Kenneth James Moore.

Fires are lit as the clock ticks in the explosive opening chapter of this historically-based, action-packed crime novel by first-time author Kenneth James Moore.

By Kenneth James Moore

THE HUNT FOR THE LIFE OF RILEY

On March 25th, 1945, Lieutenant William Weber, (Pictured on the book cover to the right) Ken’s uncle, William Weber known lovingly as Uncle Billy to Ken and the rest of his family, went “Missing in Action.”

At daybreak the next day, Marine platoons from the 4th Division formed search teams, climbing the mountainous isles along the Mariana Archipelago. Fellow B-29 crews who had within an hour of receiving base-side information, were already airborne flying dangerously low, water-skimming grids, as the Navy’s, famed, “lifeguard league” replete with subs and surface vessels, spun into action.

“Find that damn airplane. Find “The Life of Riley” ordered United States Army Air Corp General, Curtis LeMay.

Thirty days later, Billy’s family received the dreaded Western Union telegram informing them that their youngest had been officially declared: “MIA, missing in action.”

No less than five, air, sea and ground-based searches by the U.S. Military from March of ‘45 through February of 1949 were conducted.

No debris, no oil slick no remnant of B-29 #42-65241, the giant state-of-the-art warbird that a young man from the wheat-waving town of Walla Walla Washington, had once piloted or any trace of the crew who flew that last mission alongside Weber were ever found.

That is, until Billy’s nephew Ken, came along.

The Hunt for The Life of Riley

By Kenneth James Moore

THE HUNT FOR THE LIFE OF RILEY

 

On March 25th, 1945, Lieutenant William Weber, (Pictured on the book cover to the right) Ken’s uncle, William Weber known lovingly as Uncle Billy to Ken and the rest of his family, went “Missing in Action.”

At daybreak the next day, Marine platoons from the 4th Division formed search teams, climbing the mountainous isles along the Mariana archipelago. Fellow B-29 crews who had within an hour of receiving base-side information, were already airborne flying dangerously low, water-skimming grids, as the Navy’s, famed, “lifeguard league” replete with subs and surface vessels, spun into action.

“Find that damn airplane. Find “The Life of Riley” ordered United States Army Air Corp General, Curtis LeMay.

Thirty days later, Billy’s family received the dreaded Western Union telegram informing them that their youngest had been officially declared: “MIA, missing in action.”

No less than five, air, sea and ground-based searches by the U.S. Military from March of ‘45 through February of 1949 were conducted.

No debris, no oil slick no remnant of B-29 #42-65241, the giant state-of-the-art warbird that a young man from the wheat-waving town of Walla Walla Washington, had once piloted or any trace of the crew who flew that last mission alongside Weber were ever found.

That is, until Billy’s nephew Ken, came along.

These men gave their lives for the freedoms every American enjoys. They will not be lost to history. The memory of these men shall not be simply concluded as “missing in action.”

– Kenneth James Moore

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